Quantitative adjectives

Words which refer to indefinite quantities, or to definite but unknown people and objects, are called determiners. There are two types of determiners: quantitative adjectives and distributive adjectives.

Notes

Quantitative determiners come before a noun to indicate its amount or quantity.

They answer the questions "how much?" or "how many?"

Learn FREE with videos and interactive exercises

Quantitative adjectives - Video 1

WATCH THE VIDEO AND REPEAT:

"I'M REALLY HUNGRY.

OK. I'VE GOT SOME CHICKEN IN THE FRIDGE, DO YOU WANT SOME?

YES, PLEASE. MOM, DO YOU HAVE ANY JUICE?

SURE."

Some, any, little

SOME refers to an indefinite quantity or number:

  • There are some pens on the table.
  • I need some cash.

ANY refers to an indefinite quantity or number, but it is used in negative sentences and in questions:

  • I haven't got any luggage.
  • Do you have any books?

LITTLE is used with singular, uncountable nouns:

  • I have little money with me.
  • Students have only a little time to end the homework.

Watch out! We use SOME in questions that are offering/making requests:

  • Would you like some water?
  • Can you give me some information?

 

Download the worksheet below and practise!

Quantitative adjectives - Video 2

WATCH THE VIDEO AND REPEAT:

"MOM, CAN WE GO SHOPPING?

I DON’T KNOW, I HAVE LITTLE TIME.

I NEED JUST A FEW PENS FOR TOMORROW.

OK, LET’S GO."

Few, only a few, quite a few

We use FEW and ONLY A FEW with plural countable nouns and they emphasize a small number of something.

We use QUITE A FEW/SEVERAL with plural countable nouns and it means a lot.

  • There are few/only a few apples on the table (poche).
  • There are quite a few/several apples on the table (parecchie).

 

Download the worksheet below and practise!

Quantitative adjectives - Video 3

WATCH THE VIDEO AND REPEAT:

"THIS EXERCISE IS VERY DIFFICULT. IT TAKES A LOT OF TIME.

HOW MANY EXERCISES DO YOU HAVE TO DO?

TOO MANY."

A lot of, lots of, quite a lot of, many

We use A LOT OF and LOTS OF with plural countable nouns and with singular uncountable nouns:

  • There are a lot of books on the table.
  • There aren’t a lot of choices.
  • Do you eat lots of chocolate?

We use QUITE A LOT OF with singular uncountable nouns:

  • I need quite a lot of money to buy the red dress I like.

We use MANY with plural countable nouns:

  • I have many rubbers.

 

Very

We use VERY before adjectives and it means "a lot":

  • Susan is very nice.
  • The book is very interesting.
  • The apples are very good.

We use VERY MUCH after a verb:

  • I thank you very much.
  • I like this book very much.

Too

We use TOO meaning "more than enough" before adjectives:

  • The coffee is too hot.
  • Susan is too late.

We use TOO MUCH before an uncountable noun

  • There is too much salt in the soup.

and TOO MANY before a plural noun.

  • There are too many books in your backpack.

 

No

NO is always used in a positive sentence and it means 0 (zero).

  • There is no solution.
  • I have no idea.
  • No problem!

 

Download the worksheet below and practise!

How much, how many

When we want to know the quantity or amount of something, we use HOW MUCH with uncountable nouns

  • How much is it? 
  • How much money do you need?

and HOW MANY with plural countable nouns.

  • How many dresses do you have?
  • How many pens do you have?

 

Download the worksheet below and test yourself!